Wind Technician

Help your team install massive wind-powered generators.

Quick Stats

Salary Range
$21,000 – $62,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Wind Technicians do?

Wind power is enjoying a surge in popularity as we strive to find alternative sources of energy that don’t rely on fossil fuels, because it produces very few environmental emissions in its production or use. As a result, huge wind farms are popping up all over the country. Well, not “popping up” exactly. First, they are carefully researched and planned. Then, the Wind Technician comes in to help construct, maintain, and repair the monstrous turbines.

Of course, the use of wind to produce energy has been around for a long time. But the old-fashioned windmills we’ve seen pictured on postcards from Holland have been modernized. Now, massive turbines spin under the force of the wind, propelling a shaft within the unit. Then, a generator converts this kinetic energy into mechanical energy, which we use to heat and light our homes. With so many working parts, the skills of a Wind Technician are in high demand.

Once a wind farm is ready to start up, you — the Wind Technician — come on site to install the massive wind turbines. After the initial installation, you are responsible for repairs and maintenance. You might work at a single wind farm with multiple turbines, or at many farms, working on-site as needed. Either way, you’ll be climbing sky high to put in screws, clean blades, and check why something isn’t working on the behemoth turbines.

Wind farms are generally located in areas with naturally occurring wind, such as open prairies or along the coastline. Regardless of your location, you should be in good physical shape and comfortable working in tight spaces. This job often requires you to climb to the top of the turbine and make repairs from 300 feet in the air!

Should I be a Wind Technician?

You should have a certificate degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Reliable: You can always be counted on to do a good job.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.
  • Detail Oriented: You pay close attention to all the little details.

  • Also known as: Wind Commissioning Technician, Wind Energy Technician, Windmill Technician, Windsmith

    How to become a Wind Technician

    We recommend at least a Certificate. Check out these schools offering Wind Technician-related education!
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