Sewer Line Repairer

Respond to clogged waste conduits and patch up or replace them.
picture of Sewer Line Repairer

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$21,000 – $53,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Sewer Line Repairers do?

A sewer line is a bit like a highway. Small amounts of waste from individual houses and businesses all join together in the sewer line, and they flow together to the water treatment plant. When there’s a block in the line, the traffic backs up and backs up until waste is jammed together with nowhere to go. A Sewer Line Repairer works like a Traffic Police Officer, clearing up the obstruction and restoring flow.

Much of your work as a Sewer Line Repairer begins at manholes. When a blockage or problem is reported, you find the nearest manhole. Next, you lower a tool into the sewer line, and you move it forward and forward until you find the source of the problem. Then, you use a tool studded with tiny knives to cut that blockage apart and restore the flow.

Old sewer lines can crumble and fail. When this happens, you direct a crew of workers to break asphalt and concrete apart to expose the broken section. Then, you cut that section away and replace it with a new piece of pipe. This work is closely coordinated between you and the office of the Mayor, so people aren’t left without sewer service for long periods of time.

During the autumn months, Sewer Line Repairers are in high demand, as clumps of falling leaves gum up storm drains and sewer lines. Some blockages are easy to clear, and you simply use a rake to pull out leaves and allow the water to flow into the storm drain. Other times, you must use your knife-studded tool to cut through the leaves and make the water flow.

Should I be a Sewer Line Repairer?

You should have a high school degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Calm Under Pressure: You keep your cool when dealing with highly stressful situations.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.
  • Helpful: You always keep an eye out for what other people need.

  • How to become a Sewer Line Repairer

    Most Sewer Line Repairers have no higher education and get on-the-job training. Think about earning a Certificate to increase your competitiveness in the field. Chart?chd=s:9maaaa&chl=no+college+%2883%25%29|certificate+%2817%25%29||||&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,83,83
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