Receptionist

Provide administrative support to your office or boss.

Quick Stats


Outlook
Good

Salary Range
$18,000 – $37,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor


What do Receptionists do?

As a Receptionist, you’re usually the very first person potential customers see or speak to. As a result, you’re largely responsible for the image your company projects. This makes you one of the most important employees in the entire office.

Your first duty is to greet customers, both on the phone and in person. Because of this, it’s essential to be well spoken, courteous, and polite. Trained on how to use the particular phone system your company employs, you answer the phones, direct calls to the proper individuals, and respond to inquiries from the public.

Your exact duties depend on the type of office you work in. But no matter what it is, the great thing is that every day is different, as you never know who will stroll in the door or be on the other end of the phone line.

Receptionists are often given duties beyond answering phones and welcoming guests. Some employers want you to be able to type and to be proficient in the latest computer programs.

You can also be responsible for sending and receiving the company’s mail. Additionally, you can be in charge of keeping the calendars of one or more of the people you work for. If calendar management is one of your duties, you set appointments for clients, and check them in when they arrive.

Many people begin their careers as Receptionists and go on to other positions. This is usually an entry-level position, but employers like to promote from within if possible. If you consistently meet and exceed expectations, you may work your way up that corporate ladder sooner than you think!


Should I be a Receptionist?

You should have a certificate degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.
  • Detail Oriented: You pay close attention to all the little details.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.

  • Also known as: Clinic Receptionist, Dental Receptionist, Front Desk Receptionist, Human Resources Receptionist, Keyboard Specialist See More

    How to become a Receptionist

    Most Receptionists have a Certificate or higher. Chart?chd=s:9muhaa&chl=no+college+%2848%25%29|certificate+%2830%25%29|associate%27s+%2816%25%29|bachelor%27s+%286%25%29||&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,48,48
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