Plant Inspector

Visit factories to make sure that employees and work areas are safe.

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$20,000 – $56,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor


What do Plant Inspectors do?

Those who work at industrial plants—be they manufacturing, sewage waste treatment, or the nuclear reactor type—all have a pretty good reason for wanting a safe work environment. But they’re not the only ones. Insurance companies, labor unions, and government organizations all want safe plants as well.

That’s why the job of a Plant Inspector is so important. No matter where they work, Plant Inspectors inspect all aspects of the plant, making sure laws and regulations are being followed and the work environment is safe.

As a Plant Inspector, you look for machines that don’t pass regulations, practices that are unsafe, and employees who are not following policy. You examine the thickness of wires, ensure that safety equipment are of excellent quality, and check that maintenance schedules are up to date. When something doesn’t pass, you make a note and tell upper management. You then help figure out a plan to fix the problem, and set a future date for a follow-up inspection.

The information you find can be used a few different ways. If you work for the plant or a general government regulation agency, the facts you find will improve the plant. If you work for an insurance company, you might increase the plant’s rates, or take away their coverage completely. No matter where you work though, you always follow your inspection up with a detailed report that is filed away for future use.

This is a role many people come into later in their career. That’s because you need to have a pretty good understanding of the machines you’re looking at, and you need to know the proper operating procedures.


Should I be a Plant Inspector?

You should have a high school degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Reliable: You can always be counted on to do a good job.
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.
  • Detail Oriented: You pay close attention to all the little details.

  • Also known as: Power Plant Inspector

    How to become a Plant Inspector

    Most Plant Inspectors have no higher education and get on-the-job training. Think about earning a Certificate or Associate's degree to increase your competitiveness in the field. Chart?chd=s:9zcaaa&chl=no+college+%2869%25%29|certificate+%2828%25%29|associate%27s+%283%25%29|||&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,69,69
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