Chop down trees with chainsaws and hitch logs to extractors.

Quick Stats

Salary Range
$22,000 – $66,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Lumberjacks do?

The Lumberjack is one of the most beloved characters of American and Canadian folklore. Far from civilization, doing a tough job that few would touch (let alone love), they bring back the trees that build homes and provide a wide variety of goods for the rest of society. A love of the great outdoors and working with heavy machines is a must if you want to be a Lumberjack. You’ll be out there, all day every day, surrounded by the trees you’ll be felling and the heavy equipment you’ll use to do it.

If you’re a modern Lumberjack, you’re seldom, if ever, called upon to use the traditional tools of the trade (axes, saws, etc.). Instead, you rely on chainsaws, pulling rigs mounted on trucks, and even helicopters to get the job done. You can still wear flannel shirts if you want to, and many Lumberjacks have beards. But safety gear, like chainsaw-resistant boots, gloves, helmets, and visors, are now part of the uniform as well.

In fact, safety is probably the most important part of the job. Whether you’re a Faller cutting down the trees or a Choke Setter attaching the cables used to haul them out, you need to constantly be on the lookout for safety, both yours and your teammates’.

Lumberjacks always work in groups, usually living together in isolated locations, so teamwork and getting along well with others is a must. The work is strenuous and physically demanding, accounting for the legendary appetites often associated with Lumberjacks. But if you love being out in the wilderness where few dare to venture, this could be a great job for you.

Should I be a Lumberjack?

You should have a high school degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Team Player: You're able to listen, communicate, and work with tons of different people.
  • Detail Oriented: You pay close attention to all the little details.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.

  • Also known as: Lumber Stacker Driver

    How to become a Lumberjack

    Most Lumberjacks have no higher education and get on-the-job training. Think about earning a Certificate to increase your competitiveness in the field. Chart?chd=s:9aaaaa&chl=no+college+%28100%25%29|||||&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,100,100
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