Instructional Coordinator

Promote student learning through policy setting, fund-raising and more.
picture of Instructional Coordinator

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$33,000 – $93,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Instructional Coordinators do?

Are you frustrated by the state of schools today? Do you wish you could do something to improve the situation for current and future generations of students? If so, pursuing a job as an Instructional Coordinator could be a rewarding decision. This position is typically found in schools, but may also be found in major organizations that have extensive employee-training programs.

In order to make changes as an Instructional Coordinator, you must first understand the specific issues in your school or school district. Are a majority of fourth-graders failing the fractions unit? Do the textbooks being used in modern art have copyright dates from two decades ago? Does school policy keep a group of kids from having access to the help they need? If you ask some of the same questions, choosing a career as a Instructional Coordinator may be the career-fit you’ve been searching for.

Whatever the obstacle as an Instructional Coordinator, your goal is always to promote solutions that benefit both the staff and the students. You might hunt down funding for smart boards in the classroom, or find online material that is fun and interactive for kids to use. You participate in the hiring process, and seek out Teachers who can offer new subjects or fill a void, such as remedial instruction.

The list of programs, technology, teaching tools, training, and performance improvement has no end, but you spend each day looking for ways to improve the quality of education in your school or school district. That’s no easy task considering the tight budgets across the nation. But you do your best because each child who excels in a tutoring session, earns college credit in high school, or has the opportunity to learn Latin is worth all the effort.

Should I be an Instructional Coordinator?

You should have a master's degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.
  • Helpful: You always keep an eye out for what other people need.
  • Leader: You're good at taking charge, giving directions, and inspiring other people.

  • Also known as: Assessment Director, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction See More

    How to Become an
    Instructional Coordinator

    Most Instructional Coordinators have a Master's degree. Start by getting your Bachelor's degree. Chart?chd=s:aaad9a&chl=|||bachelor%27s+%286%25%29|master%27s+%2894%25%29|&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,0,94
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