Hunting Guide

Go on hunting expeditions with clients.
picture of Hunting Guide

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$16,000 – $40,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor


What do Hunting Guides do?

As a Hunting Guide, you take your clients out into the field for the purpose of hunting and killing a specific animal. What that animal is depends on where you are and what the season is. Most Hunting Guides operate in a set geographic area, and specialize in a certain animal or animals. You may rotate your game in tune with the changing seasons, guiding people on deer hunts during some months, then turkeys next, and so on.

A select few take clients on hunts for bears and other deadly animals. But, as many predators are now endangered (ironically enough, due to overhunting), these Hunting Guides are themselves a rare breed.

As for the qualifications, hunting skills are just the beginning. You must be familiar with the trails and terrain where you operate. Hiking and camping skills are also vital, as well as the ability to locate and track animals.

Before you even get out into the field, though, you need to get your clients set up with local hunting licenses and tags for the animals you want. You also make sure they have the right guns (and permits) and equipment for the trip.

Additionally, it’s important to have a good sense of humor and the ability to be friends with just about anyone. You’ll be out in the field with people you hardly know for most of the day at least, if not for multiple days at a time.

This is not a part-time job. Hunting Guides must often rise way before dawn, prepare breakfast (and coffee, usually), and wake their clients for the hunt.

Once the animal is down, you’re usually the one to field dress it. Larger prey may require mechanical assistance to be brought back from the field, so arranging for transport by truck or ATV may be necessary. First aid and CPR skills are also important — when far from civilization, with guns and wild animals, anything can happen.


Should I be a Hunting Guide?

You should have an associate's degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Calm Under Pressure: You keep your cool when dealing with highly stressful situations.
  • Reliable: You can always be counted on to do a good job.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.

  • Also known as: Hunter Guide, River Rafting Guide

    How to become a Hunting Guide

    Hunting Guides often have an Associate's degree or higher. Chart?chd=s:9jcjpa&chl=no+college+%2835%25%29|certificate+%2820%25%29|associate%27s+%2816%25%29|bachelor%27s+%2820%25%29|master%27s+%289%25%29|&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,35,35
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