Farm Mechanic

Repair agricultural equipment in the fields and in the shop.
picture of Farm Mechanic

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$22,000 – $49,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor


What do Farm Mechanics do?

As a Farm Mechanic, you most likely work for a farm equipment dealership, maintaining the machines that are for sale. You may also make repairs on equipment that customers bring in to the dealership. Your job as a Farm Mechanic will find you indoors and out, working with your hands as well as tools and heavy machinery.

Most likely, you do a lot of your work in a shop of some sort, fixing tractors, thrashers, and other large pieces of equipment. To do all of that hard labor, you use basic hand tools, some power tools, as well as larger tools like precision and welding equipment. But while Farm Mechanics mostly work in a garage or workshop, you may be asked on occasion to go out into the fields and repair broken down equipment. You may even make a house call or two, if that’s part of your job description.

This is a kind of apprenticed position where you learn a lot of what you do from an older, more experienced Mechanic. If you have skills working in car mechanics, some of those can transfer over and be helpful for you. But for the most part, learning from someone else will be your main form of training.

Farming is a time-honored tradition that many families pass down from generation to generation. And the maintenance of the tools used for farming is just as essential to the process as the tilling of the soil itself.


Should I be a Farm Mechanic?

You should have a high school degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Independent: You enjoy flying solo and doing things your own way.
  • High Achiever: You love the challenge of tackling difficult work.
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.

  • Also known as: Combine Mechanic, Farm Implement Mechanic, Farm Machinery Erector, Farm Machinery Mechanic, Harvester Mechanic See More

    How to become a Farm Mechanic

    Most Farm Mechanics have no higher education and get on-the-job training. Think about earning a Certificate or Associate's degree to increase your competitiveness in the field. Chart?chd=s:a9ogaa&chl=|no+college+%2857%25%29|certificate+%2837%25%29|associate%27s+%286%25%29||&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,0,57
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