Experimental Welder

Analyze engineering data and weld experimental parts and assemblies.
picture of Experimental Welder

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$24,000 – $54,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Experimental Welders do?

Analyzes engineering data and welds experimental parts and assemblies to determine most effective welding processes, using various welding techniques and equipment: Analyzes engineering drawings and specifications to plan welding operations where procedural information is unavailable. Lays out parts and assemblies according to specifications. Develops templates and other work aids to hold and align parts. Determines type of welding to be used, such as metallic arc, inert gas, electrode, and oven treatment, applying knowledge of metals to be joined, contours and angles to be formed, and specified stress tolerances. Welds components in flat, vertical, or overhead positions, and adjusts amperage, voltage, and speed during joining to assure required weld deposit. Inspects grooves, angles, gap allowances, and related aspects of assembly to ensure conformance to specifications, using micrometer, caliper, and related precision measuring instruments. Observes hydrostatic, x ray, dimension tolerance, and other tests on welded surfaces to evaluate quality of weld and conformance to production requirements.

Should I be an Experimental Welder?

You should have a high school degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Independent: You enjoy flying solo and doing things your own way.
  • Reliable: You can always be counted on to do a good job.
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.

  • How to become an Experimental Welder

    Experimental Welders generally graduate from high school and get on-the-job training. Think about earning a Certificate or Associate’s degree to increase your chances of finding a good job. Check out these schools offering Experimental Welder-related education!
    Schools close to

    Careers Similar to Experimental Welder