Court Administrator

Handle the nuts and bolts of courthouse operations.
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Quick Stats

Salary Range
$41,000 – $135,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Court Administrators do?

Court Administrators take care of the day-to-day functions required to run a courthouse. You’re the court’s jack-of-all-trades. From budgeting to communications to jury management, your responsibilities run the gamut and are vital to getting cases, clients and citizens through the court system in an efficient way.

The surprising thing about a Court Administrator’s job is how different it can be depending on where you live and in which court you work. Some courts are more streamlined, and your job is to delegate tasks, lead teams and plan for the future. In this instance, your managerial talents and human resources know-how take center stage. You foresee the needs of employees under your wing before they do and use your sixth sense to prevent administrative backups before they happen.

In other courts, staffs are small and your job description is broader. From soup to nuts, you have a hand in everything. You represent the court to the community, move cases through the legal system, evaluate finances, troubleshoot problems with court facilities and are back at your desk before 5 P.M. Friday to distribute paychecks. Whew.

If it sounds daunting, take comfort in knowing you won’t have to go it alone. Organizations like the National Association for Court Management define the essential skills you need in any Court Administrator role so you can get the education and training you need to do your job well. So don’t be afraid to dive in head-first, Superman. The fate of courthouse operations depends on you.

Should I be a Court Administrator?

You should have an associate's degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.
  • Independent: You enjoy flying solo and doing things your own way.
  • Detail Oriented: You pay close attention to all the little details.

  • Also known as: Assisted Living Administrator, Facilities Coordinator, Facility Coordinator, Operations Administrator See More

    How to become a Court Administrator

    Most Court Administrators have an Associate's degree or higher. Chart?chd=s:s9o7ga&chl=no+college+%2821%25%29|certificate+%2829%25%29|associate%27s+%2819%25%29|bachelor%27s+%2828%25%29|master%27s+%283%25%29|&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,21,29
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