Collator Operator

Operate basic office machines, like binders, copiers, or envelope stuffers.
picture of Collator Operator

Quick Stats


Salary Range
$18,000 – $50,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor


What do Collator Operators do?

A Collator Operator works with office machines to reproduce documents. Falling under the broader category of Office Machine Operators, a Collator Operator works alongside Printing Press Operators and other printing-related workers. Jobs are available in a variety of fields, although opportunities are typically found in the printing industry.

As a Collator Operator, you’re responsible for running and overseeing a number of different machines. The ability to understand and follow instructions, both verbal and written, is mandatory, making courses in English and communications necessary. Also, basic mechanical aptitude is needed, as you load paper into the machines and make minor repairs as needed.

The pieces of office equipment you use as a Collator Operator include scanners, addressing machines, stencil-cutting machines, folding and inserting machines, and binder machines. When a large print order is in production, you begin by interpreting the customer’s directions. From there, you begin making the copies in preparation for hole punching, folding, and eventually envelope stuffing. During each step of the process, you must watch for inconsistencies, problems, errors, or machine malfunction to ensure that quality copies are produced.

Time and project management skills are also essential, as you’re likely to have several projects going simultaneously. You put your basic mathematics skills to the test as you compute cost estimations for clients, as well as final invoices upon project completion.

The ability to stand, bend, lift and carry things, and twist is necessary, too, as the job keeps you constantly moving. Producing tangible results provides immediate gratification, but if you’re afraid of paper cuts, this might not be the job for you.


Should I be a Collator Operator?

You should have a certificate degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Trustworthy: You are known for your personal integrity and honesty.
  • Levelheaded: You hold your emotions in check, even in tough situations.
  • Calm Under Pressure: You keep your cool when dealing with highly stressful situations.

  • Also known as: Financial Operations Clerk, Freight Claim Investigator

    How to become a Collator Operator

    We recommend at least a Certificate. Check out these schools offering Collator Operator-related education!
    Schools close to
         
     




    Careers Similar to Collator Operator