Charge Nurse

Care for patients and supervise other Nurses on your shift or floor.
picture of Charge Nurse

Quick Stats

Very Good

Salary Range
$44,000 – $95,000

Data from U.S. Department of Labor

What do Charge Nurses do?

A Charge Nurse is in charge of the nursing staff during a given shift at a hospital, clinic, or other medical facility. Charge Nurses typically report to the Nurse Manager, who is responsible for the entire department.

During your shift, it’s your job as Charge Nurse to make sure things run smoothly. That means you monitor the Nurses’ work, and take note of any areas that need improvement. With that information, you can schedule and present training sessions to continually educate the staff.

You wear many hats for this position. The Nurses depend on you for their schedules, for answers to policy questions, even for emotional support after the loss of a patient. You are motivator and mentor, Supervisor and Counselor.

When you’re not working one on one with the other Nurses, you order supplies and maintain the necessary inventory for the department. To do this efficiently, you keep abreast of the budgets for the department, and do your best to keep spending in tow.

While all of these tasks fall under the umbrella of your position, you are also a Nurse. So your primary job is to provide quality care for the patients on your floor. That means you trade your managerial hat for the one marked “Empathy” whenever necessary. You make rounds with the Doctor, take and record vital signs, monitor behavior, administer medications, and notify the Doctor if there is an emergency.

Part Supervisor and part Nurse, you juggle many responsibilities. And in the process, you challenge all your skills and help people at the same time.

Should I be a Charge Nurse?

You should have an associate's degree or higher and share these traits:
  • Helpful: You always keep an eye out for what other people need.
  • Reliable: You can always be counted on to do a good job.
  • Calm Under Pressure: You keep your cool when dealing with highly stressful situations.

  • Also known as: Burn Center Nurse, CCU Nurse, County Nurse, Relief Charge Nurse

    How to become a Charge Nurse

    Most Charge Nurses have an Associate's degree. Chart?chd=s:bd9caa&chl=no+college+%282%25%29|certificate+%284%25%29|associate%27s+%2864%25%29|bachelor%27s+%2829%25%29|master%27s+%281%25%29|&cht=p3&chs=466x180&chxr=0,2,64
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