How Much Does a Pediatrician Make?


Even though Dr. Seuss wasn’t a Pediatrician, it would be a great name for a child’s Physician, wouldn’t it? In a Pediatrician career, you specialize in the care and treatment of infants, children, teenagers, and young adults. You work with other Physicians and Nurses, administering vaccines and treating day-to-day illnesses such as minor injuries, common colds, and infections. Some Pediatrician careers lead to specializations in autoimmune disorders, surgery, or chronic ailments.

What is the expected salary?

Not surprisingly, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics lists the earnings of Pediatricians and all Physicians as among the highest of any occupation. The salary of a Pediatrician varies depending on a few factors, but generally, it averages $186,044 annually for those practicing general pediatric medicine. Practicing in any of the pediatric specialties increases that salary dramatically to an average of $339,738 annually.

What are the factors that influence pediatrics salary?

The location, size, and type of practice, along with the experience level of the Pediatrician, typically influence pediatrics salary more than other factors. Pediatricians practicing in large cities and metropolitan areas tend to make more than those in rural areas. Self-employed Pediatricians usually have a higher salary than those who work in hospitals or other healthcare facilities. As the practice grows and more patients are treated, the income generated is likely to be greater as well.

Will I find employment?

Finding a job should not be a problem for most who are beginning a Pediatrician career. Overall, the medical field is expected to grow much faster than average, at 22 percent by 2018. The growth is anticipated because of the continued increase in population and the number of babies born every day. So, even though you may incur student loan debt to start a Pediatrician career, you stand a fantastic chance of securing gainful employment to repay it.



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