How Much Does a Chef Make?


Crafting tasty treats to tantalize the taste buds and searing sizzling, drool-inducing steaks are all in a day’s work for Chefs. As a Chef, you’re responsible for cooking food and overseeing kitchen workers. With your experience, honed techniques, and creativity, you’re the most skilled Cook in the kitchen, tasked with developing recipes that keep customers coming back for more. In many restaurants, you’re also in charge of ordering supplies, negotiating the best price from suppliers, and sticking to a budget.

The hours are long, customers are often picky, and managing employees may interfere with cooking, but the trade-off is you get to experience the sheer joy of cooking good food every single day, and basking in the gratitude of delighted diners.

What is the average income of a Chef?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average income of a Chef was $38,770 as of May 2008. However, it’s important to note that the average salary of a Chef varies greatly depending on the location and type of employment. The lowest-paid 10 percent of Chefs in the U.S. earned less than $22,120, while the highest-paid 10 percent earned more than $66,680. Given those statistics, you have a 50 percent chance of making between $30,000 and $52,000 annually as a Chef.

Most Executive Chefs are employed in major metropolitan areas or resorts, and typically are paid much more than the average Chef salary. New York City, NY; Atlantic City, NJ; Norwich, CT; Beaumont, TX; and Naples, FL are the highest-paying metro areas for Executive Chefs.

Can I cook up a job as a Chef?

Job opportunities for Chefs are expected to be good. However, growth is projected to be slower than average when compared to all other occupations. This already competitive field will become even more so, as Chef positions in upscale restaurants are highly coveted because of the greater salary. Chefs with a business background or experience operating their own restaurant will likely have an advantage.



Careers You May Like